Daylight Driven Office Building Design

Professorship
Building Technology and Climate Responsive Design
project

Daylight Driven Office Building Design at High Latitudes
Case study in St. Petersburg

Could glare at high latitudes caused by low sun angles be minimized at the same time reducing the periods when the blinds are down?

How to design an office building at high latitudes with adequate WWR and to provide sufficient daylight according to green building certifications such as LEED?

Is it still possible to provide good views availability for office occupants while fulfilling the criteria mentioned above?

In the master thesis, the integrated daylight design in the architectural concept and different visual comfort criteria in mid-rise office buildings at high latitudes was explored. The adopted middle latitudes “glass box” approach was questioned, and daylight driven design principles for high latitudes were derived from a theoretical framework, climate analysis, urban context, and parametric study. The viability of design principles was demonstrated in the case study design project in St. Petersburg in urban, building, details, and layout scales. The comparison during the case study was made step by step to a standard fully glazed base case office building. The evidence-based design of building form and fenestration
in office buildings at high latitudes helped to find reasonable trade-offs between low glare environment, daylighting, views, efficient window-to-wall ratio (WWR), and architectural aesthetic aspects. Daylight simulations, such as spatial Daylight Autonomy (sDA), Daylight Glare Probability (DGP), Horizontal View Analysis, and others supported the work throughout the whole process.

interior rendering
interior rendering
methodology and isometric view
methodology and isometric view
section
section
elevations and exterior rendering
elevations and exterior rendering
simulations and 2nd floor plan
simulations and 2nd floor plan